Visitors

Valeria López Fadul

Provost's Postdoctoral Scholar
PhD 2015 (history) Princeton University
AB (history) Yale University

During her postdoctoral fellowship, Valeria will teach and expand her dissertation, "Languages, Knowledge, and Empire in the Early Modern Iberian World, 1492–1650," for publication. Valeria studies early modern Iberian and colonial Latin American intellectual history with a focus on the philosophy of language. Her dissertation reassesses the linguistic component of Spanish imperialism by reconstructing the beliefs and practices with which scholars, missionaries, and crown officials confronted the challenges of governing a vast, multilingual, and transoceanic empire. She argues that rather than suppressing native languages Spanish scholars and administrators retrieved in them information about the history of their speakers or about their experiences of the natural world. The Spanish crown sponsored scientific expeditions, comprehensive censuses, local and universal histories, and the creation of libraries in order to harness linguistic knowledge for its own political benefit.

Valeria's second research project builds upon her interest in the intellectual networks spanning the Iberian Atlantic by focusing on a group of historical, natural historical, and legal compilations of the first half of the seventeenth century. These compendia, which have yet to be examined together, were the products of continuous and increasing exchanges between scholarly circles working in Seville, Madrid, New Spain, and Peru.

Courses

HIST 26121, HIPS 26121, LACS 26121 Nature, Science, and Empire in the Early Modern Iberian World, 1400–1800 (Spring 2017)

Valeria López Fadul

Pablo Palomino

Visiting Lecturer of Latin American History and in the College

Pablo Palomino received his PhD in history from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2014, and his AB in history from the University of Buenos Aires in 2005. Pablo was a visiting lecturer at Berkeley in 2014–15. His dissertation is on "Transnational Musical Networks in Latin America, 1910–1950."

Courses

LACS 24705/34705, HIST 26122/36122 Argentine Histories (Autumn 2016)

LACS 26412, HIST 26116 Music and Globalization in Modern Latin America (Spring 2017)

LACS 26413, HIST 26117 Progress and Development in Latin America (Spring 2017)

Pablo Palomino

Erika Pani

Tinker Visiting Professor (Autumn 2016–Winter 2017)

Erika Pani is research professor at el Colegio de México and serves as chair of the Centro de Estudios Históricos. Pani is a leading scholar of nineteenth-century Mexico and a pioneer of the internationalization of Mexican history. Her book Para mexicanizar el Segundo Imperio. El imaginario político de los Imperialistas (2001) relaunched the contemporary treatment of the Mexican second empire. Pani has published two single-authored monographs, various edited volumes, and many articles and essays. She has taught at Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, Instituto Mora, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Harvard University, Columbia University, Yale University, and other institutions.

Courses

LACS 25110/35110, HIST 26316/36316 Revolutions, Constitutions, and War: The United States and Latin America, 1850–1880 (Autumn 2016)

LACS 25113/35123, HIST 26124/36124 From Mestizaje to the Mexican Genome: Imagining Mexican Society during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (Winter 2017)

Erika Pani

Basil Salem

Teaching Fellow in the Social Sciences

Dissertation

Beneath Biography: Attitudes Toward Self, Society, and Empire among the Scholars of Eighteenth-Century Ottoman Damascus

Courses

SOSC 12100–12300 Self, Culture, Society 1–3 (Autumn 2016, Winter 20117, and Spring 2017))
HIST 22608  Scandal as Historical Document, Seventeenth to Twenty-first Centuries (Spring 2017)

The Social Sciences Teaching Fellows Program is a two-year program designed to enhance the pedagogical skills and research training for current and recent graduates of PhD programs in the Division of the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago. Teaching fellows teach four courses (two or three of which will be in a Core sequence for the Social Sciences). Fellows participate in a program of professional development under the joint supervision of a faculty mentor and the director of the Chicago Center for Teaching. They are also expected to advance their own research and participate in campus activities.


Fidel J. Tavárez

Provost's Postdoctoral Scholar
PhD 2016 (history) Princeton University
AB (colonial and modern Latin America history) City College of New York

Fidel J. Tavárez is a scholar of the Spanish Atlantic, with a particular focus on the intellectual, cultural, and administrative history of the Spanish empire during the eighteenth century. He also has additional research and teaching interests in the history of Atlantic empires, Enlightenment political economy, the relationship between science and empire, and the Age of Revolutions. At present, Fidel is transforming his dissertation into a book manuscript, "The Imperial Machine: Assembling the Spanish Commercial Empire, 1740–1812." The book reconstructs how a host of ministers imagined the Spanish Monarchy as a kind of machine and embarked on an ambitious project of imperial reform geared towards creating a powerful Spanish commercial empire. Fidel has published portions of his work in the Journal of Latin American Studies: "Viscardo's Global Political Economy and the First Cry for Spanish American Independence, 1767–1798." In addition to completing his first book, Fidel is currently working on an article, titled "Colonial Economic Improvement: Creating New Consulados in Spanish America during the Bourbon Reforms, 1778–1795," and hopes to complete a broader article, titled "The Birth of Economic Improvement in the Spanish Atlantic, c. 1700–1800." His future research plans include a second book project provisionally titled "Empirical Statecraft: The Emergence of an Information Empire in the Eighteenth-Century Spanish Atlantic."

Courses

HIST 26122 The Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire (Spring 2017)

Fidel J. Tavárez

Faridah Zaman

Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Research Fellow
AB 2009, MPhil 2010, PhD 2014 (all in history) Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge

Faridah Zaman's dissertation is titled, "Futurity and the Political Thought of North Indian Muslims, c. 1900–1925." Her most recent article is a case study of the relationship of the East India Company with the imperial mosque in Allahabad: "Colonizing the Sacred: Allahabad and the Company State, 1797–1857," The Journal of Asian Studies 74, no. 2 (May 2015).

Established in 2008, the Donnelley Fellowship enables recent PhDs of exceptional promise from Corpus Christi College to spend up to three years at the University of Chicago and for Chicago PhDs to do the same at Cambridge. The Donnelleys maintained ties with the two institutions throughout their lives: Gaylord Donnelley studied at Corpus Christi College and served on the University of Chicago Board of Trustees; Dorothy Ranney Donnelley was a member of the University of Chicago Women’s Board.

News

Co-host Workshop on Memory and Politics in 20th-C South Asia