Gateways

History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to first- through third-year students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.

HIST 14302  Early Modern China: An Age of Global Transformation, 1500–1800  (D. Knorr, Teaching Fellow)  The period between 1500 and 1800 was pivotal in the emergence of the modern world. We tend to focus on Europe and the Americas when we think of the changes that occurred in this period. However, this was also an age of dramatic transformation for China in ways that were connected and/or similar to changes unfolding elsewhere. After reviewing how the legacy of the Mongol conquests shaped early modern Eurasia, we will examine a series of intertwined developments that were characteristic of not only China but also global experiences in this period: population growth, expanded commercial activity, silver imports from the Americas, and the adoption of "New World" crops, such as maize and sweet potatoes. We will then look at how new intellectual currents and major shifts in government policies responded to these new social and economic realities. We will examine two developments—print culture and colonialism—that play important roles in narratives of early modern European history but are no less applicable to Chinese history. Our course will end with a consideration of how the growth of the early modern period generated not only tremendous wealth but also considerable political and ecological challenges that modern actors would struggle to overcome. For the final project, students will design a museum exhibit that focuses on one aspect of China's early modern history and underscores the global interconnectedness of this period.

HIST 14303  Modern Korean History  (J. Jeon, Teaching Fellow)  This course focuses on the modern history of a country that is well known for shifting its course at dizzying speed. Beginning with the last monarchic dynasty's "opening" to the world in the late nineteenth century, the course will move on to deal with radical transformations such as Japanese colonization and Korea's subsequent liberation in 1945; the civil war, national division, and dictatorship in the two Koreas; and the economic miracle and democratization in the South and nuclear development in the North. How do we understand recent events, such as the South Korean president's impeachment in 2017 and the North Korean leader's high-profile diplomatic détentes in 2018? Do they come out of nowhere, or can we find an underlying consistency based on an understanding of the long twentieth century? Through a careful study of Korea's modern history, this course is designed to reveal the longer trajectories of Korea's historical development, showing how the study of this contentious peninsula becomes a study of modern world history.

HIST 17606  American Revolutions  (M. Kruer)  In 1750, "British America" was a diverse and fractious collection of colonies huddled along the eastern seaboard, on the margins of the churning waters of the Atlantic world. Forty years later, thirteen of those remote American settlements had become, through rebellion and war, into a revolutionary nation. The traumatic passage of this transformation established the world's first modern republic and set in motion an age of democratic revolutions that reverberated in Europe, the Caribbean, Latin America, and western North America. This course explores this remarkable epoch in early American history. Topics include the first global military struggle (the Seven Years War); the transformation from scattered urban riots against taxes into a rebellion against the world's strongest imperial power; the everyday experience of occupation, insurgency, and civil war; Black and Native American struggles for independence; experiments in women's rights, radical democracy, and religious freedom; the fragility of the new union and the ragged road toward a federal nation-state; and the revolutionary idealism that inspired revolutions in France, Haiti, and the Americas, with consequences that shaped the early United States and all its diverse peoples. Grades will be based on three short papers and one final paper. This lecture course is open to non-History majors and does not presume any previous history coursework.

HIST 18804  America in the Nineteenth Century  (N. Maor, Teaching Fellow)  This lecture course will examine major conflicts that shaped American life during the nineteenth century. Focusing on contemporaries' attempts to seize upon or challenge the nation's commitment to the ideals of liberty and equality, we will examine pivotal moments of contestation, compromise, and community building. Central questions that will frame the course include how were notions of freedom negotiated and reshaped? What were the political and socioeconomic conditions that prompted the emergence of reform movements, including antislavery, women's rights, temperance, and labor? How did individuals mobilize and stake claims on the state? How were the boundaries of American citizenship debated and transformed over the course of the century?

History in the World

History in the World courses use history as a valuable tool to help students critically exam our society, culture, and politics. Preference given to first- and second-year students.

HIST 10200  History Lab: Migration and Mobility in Human History  (E. Osborn)  This course will explore different episodes of human mobility. We will study forced and voluntary migrations by considering the earliest movements of people out of Africa, the transatlantic slave trade, the displacements in Europe produced by World War II, and the current flows of people from Africa and the Middle East across the Mediterranean. These wide-ranging topics necessarily demand that students use a variety of primary sources and methodologies; assigned readings will thus be supplemented by documentaries, audio recordings, artistic renditions, and material culture. For their final project students will be required to work individually or in teams to investigate an example of human migration. Student may present the results of this research as a formal academic essay, may create a website or video, or use some other medium.

Research Colloquia

History majors take at least one history colloquium, though you are welcome to take more than one. Students interested in pursuing the research or BA-thesis track should take a colloquium prior to Spring Quarter of their third year; those pursuing other tracks can take a colloquium at any point prior to graduation.

HIST 29652  Migration and Citizenship  (M. Briones)  Looking through a broad interdisciplinary lens, this colloquium examines the history of migration and citizenship. The focus is largely on the United States, but, given its topic, the course will necessitate transnational and comparative histories. How did nineteenth- and early twentieth-century "sojourners" become "citizens"? What constituted the public's perception of some immigrants as inassimilable aliens and others as an ostensible "model minority"? We will interrogate not only what it means to have been and to be an immigrant in America but also what it means to be a citizen in a multiracial democracy. As a history colloquium, the course's main purpose is to help students learn to write a long research paper based on primary sources. The class is not a survey course. We will be taking on specific episodes and themes in immigration history. Assignments: an original research paper (15–20 pages) using primary and secondary sources.

HIST 29678  Medicine and Society  (M. Rossi)  How does medical knowledge change? How do medical practices transform over time? What factors influence the ways in which doctors and patients—and scientists, artists, politicians, legislators, activists, and educators, among others—understand matters of health and disease, of proper and improper interventions, of the rights of individuals and the needs of communities? This course treats these questions as a starting point for exploring the interactions of medicine and society from 1800 to the present. Through a combination of primary and secondary sources we will examine changing causes of morbidity and mortality, the development of new medical technologies and infrastructures, shifting patterns of disease and shifting ideas about bodies, and debates about health care policy, among other topics. Assignment: students will be expected to conduct original research and produce an original research paper of fifteen to twenty pages.

Methodology

HIST 29802  BA Thesis Seminar II  (C. Kindell & C. Rydell)  The seminar is a forum to discuss and critique BA theses. Ideally, students will have completed most of their research for the thesis and will use this quarter to produce a complete draft. Early weeks of the seminar will be devoted to writing strategies and discussion of the introduction. Sections of the theses will be critiqued in the middle weeks of term, while in the final weeks of the quarter full rough drafts will be read. The final deadline for submission of the BA thesis is second week of Spring Quarter.

HIST 29803  Historiography  (P. O'Donnell)  The course provides a systematic introduction to historical methodology and approaches (e.g., political, intellectual, social, cultural, economic, gender, environmental history), as well as research techniques. Students will gain analytical, research, and writing tools that will assist them in their capstone projects, research colloquia, or BA theses. Assignments: weekly response papers, short presentation and paper, take-home final exam. Historiography is required for all majors beginning with the class of 2021, but open to all students.

HIST 29805  Capstone Seminar  (P. O'Donnell)  Capstone Seminar is a forum to create, discuss, and develop History capstone projects. Early weeks of the seminar will be devoted to exploring various forms historical work can take, from museum installations to podcasts and documentaries. In-process work will beshared and critiqued in workshops. The course meets every other week in autumn and winter, allowing students ample time to develop their projects on their own. The final deadline for submission of the Capstone Project is the second week of Spring Quarter.

Courses

HIST 10102  Introduction to African Civilization II  (K. Hickerson)  African Civilization introduces students to African history in a three-quarter sequence. Part two examines the transformations of African societies in the long nineteenth century. At the beginning of the era, European economic and political presence was mainly coastal, but by the end, nearly the entire continent was colonized. This course examines how and why this occurred, highlighting the struggles of African societies to manage internal reforms and external political, military, and economic pressures. Topics include the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili coast, Islamic reform movements across the Sahara, and connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent. Students will examine memoirs of African soldiers, religious texts, colonial handbooks, and visual and material sources, including ethnographic artifacts, photographs, and textiles. Assignments: team projects, document and material analyses, response papers, essays, and written exams. The course will equip students with a working knowledge of the struggles that created many of the political and social boundaries of modern Africa.

MUSI 12200/HIST 12800  Music in Western Civilization II: To 1750  This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

HIST 13001  History of European Civilization I  European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization.

HIST 13002  History of European Civilization II  European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization.

HIST 13200  History of Western Civilization II  (K. Weintraub)  Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence.

HIST 13600  America in World Civilization II  The American Civ sequence is nothing like your high-school history class, for here we examine America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. The nineteenth-century segment of America in World Civilizations asks: What happens when democracy confronts inequality? We focus on themes that include indigenous-US relations; religious revivalism and reform; slavery, the Civil War, and emancipation; the intersection between women's rights and antislavery; the development of industrial capitalism; urbanism and social inequality.

HIST 14000  Introduction to Russian Civilization II (E. Gilburd & R. Bird)  This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

HIST 15200  Introduction to East Asian Civilization II  (J. Ketelaar)  This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a three-quarter sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present. Taking these courses in sequence is not required.

LACS 16200/HIST 16102  Introduction to Latin American Civilization II  (D. Borges)  Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands). The second quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

HIST 16800  Ancient Mediterranean World II: Rome (A. Bresson)  Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD). This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community.

HIPS 17402/HIST 17402  Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: History of Medicine 1  (M. Rossi)  Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Our aim is to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the cultural and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and society. This course examines the history of medicine from the Renaissance through the end of the eighteenth century, when many features of medicine that we now consider "modern" were coming into being. Topics include the history of anatomy and physiology, including Vesalius and Harvey; the history of relations between doctors and patients, including traditional medical practitioners and midwives; and the changing nature of the hospital.

ENGL 17950/HIST 17604  The Declaration of Independence  (E. Slauter)  This course offers an extended investigation of the origins, meanings, and legacies of the Declaration of Independence, one of the most consequential documents in world history. Primary and secondary readings provide a series of philosophical, political, economic, social, religious, literary, and legal perspectives on the text's sources and meanings; its drafting, circulation, and early reception in the age of the American Revolution; and its changing place in American culture and world politics over nearly 250 years.

HIPS 18400/HIST 17410  Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: Renaissance to Enlightenment  (R. Richards)  Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This lecture-discussion course examines the development of science and scientific philosophy from the mid-fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. Considerations begin with the recovery of an ancient knowledge in the works of Leonardo, Vesalius, Harvey, and Copernicus. Thereafter the course will focus on Enlightenment science, as represented by Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. The course will culminate with the work of Darwin, who utilized traditional concepts to inaugurate modern science. For each class, the instructor will provide a short introductory lecture on the texts and then open discussion to pursue with students the unexpected accomplishments of the authors under scrutiny.

SALC 20100/HIST 10800  Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I  (M. Alam)  This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence. The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia's early encounters with Europe.

NEHC 20202/HIST 15612  Islamicate Civilization II, 950–1750  (F. Lewis)  This course surveys intellectual, cultural, religious, and political developments in the Islamic world from Andalusia to the South Asian subcontinent, 950–1750. We trace the arrival and incorporation of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols) into the central Islamic lands; the splintering of the Abbasid Caliphate and the impact on political theory; the flowering of literature of Arabic, Turkic, and Persian expression; the evolution of religious and legal scholarship and devotional life; transformations in the intellectual and philosophical traditions; the emergence of Shi`i states (Buyids and Fatimids); the Crusades and Mongol conquests; the Mamluks and Timurids, and the "gunpowder empires" of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls; the dynamics of gender and class relations; etc. This class partially fulfills the requirement for MA students in CMES, as well as for NELC majors and PhD students.

NEHC 20602/HIST 25615  Islamic Thought and Literature II  This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century CE through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. This course covers the period from circa 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture, and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources, and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political, and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals). All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required.

NEHC 20605/HIST 26005  Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History  (J. Woods)  This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

SCTH 20671/HIST 25118  The Voice of the Past: Aural History from the Golden Age of Radio to Today  (D. Gutherz)  What happens when we use our ears to understand the past? What kinds of historical narratives are most suited for the sound waves and how should we judge these narratives? In this course, we will seek to both historicize the ongoing "podcast revolution" and expand students' critical toolbox in order to evaluate history that is written to be heard. For practical reasons, the course will focus on audio documentaries produced in and for the Anglophone world. Students will be asked to analyze the rhetoric, ideology, accuracy, and archival practices of experimental documentaries and popular, historically inflected programs (such as Slow Burn, This American Life, and Radiolab). Our goal is not only to judge these works of aural history but also to reflect on their social significance. To this end, we will compare such programs to documentaries and dramas from the so-called golden age of radio (1920s–1960s) and to academic scholarship dealing with phenomena discussed on air. Additionally, since podcasters are often praised for helping to democratize the radio, we will pay special attention to previous waves of democratizers, especially the "pirate radio" and "audio blog" movements of the 1970s and 1980s. Practical guidance will be available to students who want to produce podcasts for the class, but this will not be a requirement.

HIST 21404  Britain in the Age of Steam 1783–1914  (F. Albritton Jonsson)  Britain in the Victorian era rose to global dominance by pioneering a new fossil fuel economy. This course explores the profound impact of coal and steam on every aspect of Victorian society, from politics and religion to industrial capitalism and the pursuit of empire. Our historical investigation also serves a second purpose by helping us see our own fossil-fuel economy with fresh eyes through comparison with Victorian energy use. Assignments include short essays based on energy "field work" and explorations in material culture.

HIST 22207  The Social History of Alcohol in Early Modern Europe (C. Rydell, Teaching Fellow)  This course will examine the multifaceted historical role that beer, wine, cider, and spirits played in European society and will challenge students to consider how a seemingly familiar commodity was a key component in shaping early modern social relations. It will focus on several major themes that have guided historical inquiry and show how hard drink intersects with and entangles these histories. Major themes will include alcohol and gender relations; state legality and taxation; moral policing; environmental projects and crises; labor and technology; and colonialism. Using both primary and secondary sources will push students to look below the surface to see how drink alternately challenged or reinforced social hierarchies, much as it continues to do in the present time.

HIST 22310  The Commons: Environment and Economy in Early Modern Europe  (O. Cussen, Teaching Fellow)  Drawing on case studies from Europe and the Atlantic world, this course will track changes in land use and property rights over the early modern period (ca. 1500–1800), inviting students to reflect on the relationship between natural environments (woodlands, waterways, pasture) and histories of state formation, economic growth, rebellion, and colonialism. Organizing concepts and debates will include the tragedy of the commons, moral economies, sustainability and scarcity, the "organic economy" of the old regime, primitive accumulation, and economic takeoff. Readings will encompass classic works in agrarian, environmental, and social history (i.e., Marc Bloch, E. P. Thompson, Silvia Federici, James Scott, Carolyn Merchant) as well as primary documents and contemporary texts (i.e., More, Bacon, Smith, Paine, Babeuf). We will also reflect on how these histories bear on debates about land use and natural resources in the present day.

HIST 23103  East Central Europe, 1880–Present  (T. Zahra)  The past 150 years have brought democratization, mass politics, two violent world wars, and no less than four different political regimes to the lands between Germany and the Soviet Union. The focus of this course will be on the forces that have shaped Eastern European politics and society since the 1880s. How and why was a multinational and multilingual empire transformed into self-declared nation states? How has mass migration reshaped East European societies? What were the causes and consequences of ethnic cleansing in East Central Europe? How did the experience of total war transform the states and societies? How did citizens respond to and participate in the construction of socialist societies after the Second World War? And finally, what changes and challenges has the transition from socialism to capitalism brought to the region since 1989? The course will focus on the Habsburg Monarchy and its successor states, particularly Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Hungary, with occasional discussion of the former Yugoslavia and Romania. Assignments: three short papers (5–6 pages).

HIST 23407  Comparative Kingship: Rulers in 12th-Century Europe  (J. Lyon)  The purpose of this course is to examine the different forms that kingship took in the Latin Christian kingdoms of Europe during the twelfth century. In the first half of the course, we will read and discuss a broad range of primary and secondary sources that will give us the opportunity to analyze critically kingship in England, France, and Germany (the Holy Roman Empire). In the second half of the course, we will broaden our discussion to consider how other kingdoms in Europe—including Scotland, Norway, Denmark, Poland, Hungary, Sicily, Aragon, and Castile—do and do not conform to more general models of twelfth-century European kingship.

HIST 24001  Love and Eros in Japanese History  (J. Ketelaar)  An examination of cultural forms of affection and the erotic throughout history on the Japanese archipelago. Materials from ancient myth–historical, aristocratic-literary, Buddhistic-devout, Confucian-chaste, and commercialized-erotic imaginations (along with others) will be examined.

CRES 24001/HIST 18301 & CRES 24002/HIST 18302  Colonizations I & II  This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

HIST 24905  Darwin's On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man  (R. Richards)  This lecture-discussion class will focus on a close reading of Darwin's two classic texts. An initial class or two will explore the state of biology prior to Darwin's Beagle voyage, and then consider the development of his theories before 1859. Then we will turn to his two books. Among the topics of central concern will be the logical, epistemological, and rhetorical status of Darwin's several theories, especially his evolutionary ethics; the religious foundations of his ideas and the religious reaction to them; and the social-political consequences of his accomplishment. The year 2019 was the 210th anniversary of Darwin's birth and the 160th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species.

HIST 25218  American Epidemics, Past and Present  (C. Kindell, Teaching Fellow)  This course explores how disease epidemics have shaped watershed periods in US history from the late eighteenth century to the present. Through readings, lectures, and in-class discussions, we will employ different categories of analysis (e.g., race, gender, class, and citizenship) to answer a range of historical questions focused on disease, health, and medicine. For instance, to what extent did smallpox alter the trajectory of the American Revolution? How did cholera and typhoid affect the lived experiences of slaves and soldiers during the Civil War? In what ways did the US government capitalize on fears over yellow fever and bubonic plague to justify continued interventions across the Caribbean and the Pacific? What do these episodes from the American past reveal about contemporary encounters with modern diseases like HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and COVID-19? Course readings will be drawn from book chapters and scholarly articles, as well as primary sources ranging from public-health reports, medical correspondence, and scientific journals to newspapers, political cartoons, maps, and personal diaries. Grades will be based on participation, weekly Canvas posts, peer review, and a series of written assignments (a proposal and an annotated bibliography, primary source analysis, book review, and rough draft) all of which will culminate in a ten-page final research paper.

CLCV 25806/HIST 20309  Greek Epigraphy beyond the Eurphrates  (A. Bresson)  Following the conquest of Alexander, Greek became the language of power all over the Near East and up to central Asia and India (for a while). Even the fall of the various Greek kingdoms at the end of the Hellenistic period did not mark the end of the habit of writing in Greek. Inscriptions in Greek coming from those regions are still to be found in significant number up to the third century CE. This class will cover all types of inscriptions, from slave manumissions to civic decrees or royal letters, and from modest epitaphs to sophisticated verse epigrams. It will illustrate the vitality and prestige of Greek culture well beyond the regions close to the Mediterranean Sea.

HIST 26220  Brazil: Another American History  (B. Fischer)  Brazil is in many ways a mirror image of the United States: an almost continental democracy, rich in natural resources, populated by the descendants of three continents, shaped by colonialism, slavery, and sui generis liberal capitalism. Why, then, has Brazil's historical path been so distinct? To explore this question, this course will focus on the history of economic development, race, citizenship, urbanization, the environment, popular culture, violence, and the challenge of democracy. Assignments: weekly reading, participation in discussions, weekly journal posts, and a final paper.

HIST 26409  Revolution, Dictatorship, and Violence in Modern Latin America  (B. Fischer)  This course will examine the role played by Marxist revolutions, revolutionary movements, and the right-wing dictatorships that have opposed them in shaping Latin American societies and political cultures since the end of World War II. Themes examined will include the relationship among Marxism, revolution, and nation building; the importance of charismatic leaders and icons; the popular authenticity and social content of Latin American revolutions; the role of foreign influences and interventions; the links between revolution and dictatorship; and the lasting legacies of political violence and military rule. Countries examined will include Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, Argentina, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Peru, Venezuela, Bolivia, and Mexico. Assignments: weekly reading, a midterm exam or paper, a final paper, participation in discussion, and weekly responses or quizzes.

HIST 27001  Law and Society in Early America, 1600–1800  (E. Cook)  This colloquium considers law, legal institutions, and legal culture within the lived experience of colonial and revolutionary America. It will emphasize the interaction of social development and legal development and will explore the breadth of everyday experience with legal institutions like the jury, with courts as institutions for resolving disputes, and with the prosecution of crime.

HIST 27307  Schools and Space: A Chicago History  (N. Kryczka, Teaching Fellow)  This course fuses urban and educational history into a two-century case study of Chicago. When the Chicago Public Schools closed fifty schoolhouses in 2013, many stressed the links between public education, uneven neighborhood investment, and racial segregation. But this episode was part of a longer regional history of how metropolitan development, labor markets, and anxieties over migration affected educational policy. The course stresses the relationship between educational policy and the politics of urban development, gender, and race. Schools were sites of gendered work, for the women who operated them and for the children who navigated the moral and vocational paths laid for their futures; meanwhile, the rise of racial ghettoes had an enduring impacts on educational inequity and the shape of African American political life. Over the time span covered by the course, the United States became an indisputably "schooled" society, and Chicago was a leading indicator of national trends. Key historic episodes in American education—the rise of the modern high school, the birth of progressive education, the origins of teachers' unions, the Catholic encounter with race, the fragmentation of suburban school districts, the civil-rights critique of de facto school segregation, the pronounced "failure" of urban education, and the triumph of choice-and-accountability reforms, and the teacher-led resistance that followed—are especially well-illustrated by this course's focus on Chicago. This course combines lecture with discussions of primary sources and secondary literature each week, beginning with the one-room, log-stable schoolhouses of the antebellum Illinois prairie and ending with the nation's first charter-school teacher strikes in 2018. In addition to composing a research paper on a chosen school or school policy, students will take a field trip to local schoolhouses, reading the city's urban history through its educational architecture.

HIST 27310  African American History, 1865–2016  (A. Green)  This class will introduce students to the key themes, events, problems and advances within African American history, after the end of slavery. Readings will include Reconstruction era documents, Ida B. Wells, Ned Cobb, W. E. B. Du Bois, Howard Thurman, Septima Clark, Philippe Wamba, and Audre Lorde among others. Assignments will include two papers, and a series of short response pieces.

CRES 27540/HIST 29008  Slave Abolition and Its Afterlives  (L. Svabek)  In recent years scholars and activists have (re)turned to the abolitionist movement of the nineteenth century in order to gain critical traction on the interlocking operations of racism, capitalism, and patriarchy. The return of abolitionism reveals an aspiration to learn from the failures of the past and to generate new strategies to overcome the structures of domination that pervade our social and political lives. We will read a series of texts produced before and after the formal end of slavery in the United States with particular attention to the revisions, retrospections, and reformulations made to conceptions of freedom. How did abolitionists understand the meaning of freedom before emancipation? What political transformations did they endorse? Did emancipation actualize or reframe the abolitionist imaginary? We will also track two unfulfilled promises in the thought of black scholars and activists: the attempt to secure economic independence for freed slaves and critiques of patriarchal rule within the family. By tracking these political projects, we will raise questions about the re-emergence of abolitionist promises. How does the present trend to appropriate abolition occlude key political disagreements among early and mid-nineteenth century activists? Which strand of abolitionism are we inheriting in the twenty-first century? Why? These questions will anchor our course and help us think about the uses of history for our own political present.

HIST 27906  Capitalism, Gender, and Intimate Life  (G. Winant)  What is the relationship between the capitalist economy and the gendered organization of society and identity of individuals? Are these two systems, or one? This class pursues these questions, seeking to understand capitalism as an everyday and intimate experience. How have markets and production shaped and been shaped by personal identity, and in particular gendered identity? We examine the historical interrelationships among practices of sexuality, marriage, family, reproduction, labor, and consumption and trace the economic dimensions of masculinity and femininity over time, focusing largely but not exclusively on US history. Assignments: midterm paper (8–10 pages) applying a theoretical reading to a secondary text, and a final paper (15 pages) based on secondary research.

EALC 28150/HIST 24516  Women and Work in East Asia  (J. Eyferth)  This course examines changes in the working lives of East Asian women from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Most of the readings will be on China but we will also discuss Korea and Japan.

LLSO 29067/HIST 27118  Christianity Confronts Capitalism: Natural Law, Political Economy, and Social Reform in the Industrial Era  (R. Kaminsky)  Christianity's relationship with commerce was fraught long before the industrial era, when Christianity upheld property rights alongside the poor's beatitude. Later, industrial capitalism tied the faith to the economic system, while the late nineteenth-century Social Gospel Movement popularized ideas of social justice in response to the limits of laissez-faire economics. This course will combine intellectual, social, and legal history to examine how various Christian traditions have grappled with liberal capitalism and its revolutionary critics. We will explore these traditions' competing visions of a moral political economy, how their adherents attempted to put them into action, and where these attempts placed them vis-à-vis society and civil authorities, especially in the courtroom. After a brief introduction of key Judeo-Christian texts bearing on political and economic activity, we will consider various churches' alternatives to liberal capitalism and revolutionary movements' materialism, including Catholic social thought (from Pope Leo XIII's 1891 Rerum novarum to Pope Francis's 2015 Laudato si') and Abraham Kuyper's neo-Calvinist tradition. We will put these in dialogue with the practical efforts of Social Gospel reformers, the Catholic Workers Movement, and Latin American liberation theology, as well as Hobby Lobby's and Chick-fil-A's attempts at evangelical business. Throughout, students will consider relationships between church and state, doctrine and practice, and natural law and the law of the market.

HIPS 29638/HIST 25022  Tutorial: Vitalism and Teleology in Biology—Historical and Philosophical Approaches  (B. Deadman)  "What is life?" has a claim, unsurprisingly, to being one of the oldest questions in science, lagging only a little behind "what is?" It may be more surprising to learn that arguably all major answers to the question (from materialism and epiphenomenalism on one end to holism and essentialism on the other) are about as old, and that the history of biology has been more a matter of recombining these answers than coming up with new ones. If biology is a game, its ground rules were laid early on. You may propose ingenious modifications of strategy, but go too far outside the box and your fellow players will likely accuse you of playing a different game altogether—if you haven't already been disqualified by the referees. We will approach these questions by considering the history of biology as the history of philosophical attempts at making sense of life, broadly conceived, from Aristotle to Darwin. Such "philosophies" of life need not be held self-consciously, and the most interesting ones often aren't. Rather, any scientific account of life necessarily entails making metaphysical commitments. By tracing the history of these commitments, we will consider which (if any) of their historical mutations have been novel, and where we currently stand. We will also consider the ways in which philosophies of life, with all their metaphysical entanglements, have themselves been entangled with politics and ideology.

HIST 29201  Puerto Rico  (D. Borges)  An examination of the current situation of Puerto Rico in historical perspective. Assignments: short papers, quizzes, midterm exam, final paper.

HIST 29318  Modern Disability Histories: Gender, Race, and Disability  (M. Appeltová, Teaching Fellow)  This course introduces students to the conceptual apparatus of disability studies and major developments in disability history since the late nineteenth century. The course will consider disability beyond physical impairment, centering the ways in which notions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability interact and shape subjects, and how these subject positions shift across political watersheds. Students will engage a variety of sources, such as autobiographies, pamphlets, visual material, laws, and medical texts, as well as historiographical sources. Topics will include late nineteenth-century female "hysteria," evolutionary approaches to sign language and orality, and the effects of industrialization on new impairments; early twentieth-century eugenics and the Nazi T4 program; postwar developments in prosthetics and discursive intersections between psychosis and civil rights movement. Students are encouraged to work on creative collective projects (e.g., an exhibit or a short video) in addition to written assignments.

HIST 29426  Lost Histories of the Left  (F. Hillis)  When most Americans think about "the left," Marxism, Soviet state socialism, or European social democracy spring to mind. This class will explore alternative—but now largely forgotten—blueprints for revolutionizing the political and social order that emerged in the nineteenth century. We will pay special attention to utopian socialism, early anticolonial movements, the Jewish Labor Bund, and anarchism. Examining the intellectual underpinnings of these movements, their influence on the modern world, and the factors that led to their demise, we will also consider what lessons they can teach to those committed to realizing a better future today.

HIST 29427  Fashion, Empire, Capitalism  (K. Hickerson)  Clothing, what anthropologist Terence Turner termed "the social skin," mediates between individuals and society. Chosen to articulate personal taste or assigned as uniforms to signify a collective identity, fashion is marked by politics, both historically and in the contemporary world. Today, the fashion industry employs one in six people on earth and is one of the largest contributors to global carbon emissions. Considering fashion in relation to empires and capitalism can shed light on the forces of the past and asks how these continue to animate the present. This course will include museum visits and object-centered analysis of specific kinds of dress, such as Nazi uniforms, the zoot suit, saris, and kanga cloth. It will analyze social difference articulated through fashion in colonial Lima and twentieth-century Khartoum; global and imperial competitions over fashion-related commodities, such as Dutch, French, and English imperial officials attempt to break the Spanish monopoly of Aztec cochineal, a brilliant red dye that was once one of the world's most prestigious commodities; and consumers' influence on markets, such as nineteenth-century Zanzibari women dictating styles and driving competition between Indian, American, and British cloth producers. Finally, the course, examines the place of fashion within the histories of imperialism and capitalism by examining the transformations in cotton production that ignited the Industrial Revolution. Assignments: material analyses, essays, and an original research project.

HIPS 29638/HIST 25022  Tutorial: Vitalism and Teleology in Biology—Historical and Philosophical Approaches  (B. Deadman)  "What is life?" has a claim, unsurprisingly, to being one of the oldest questions in science, lagging only a little behind "what is?" It may be more surprising to learn that arguably all major answers to the question (from materialism and epiphenomenalism on one end to holism and essentialism on the other) are about as old, and that the history of biology has been more a matter of recombining these answers than coming up with new ones. If biology is a game, its ground rules were laid early on. You may propose ingenious modifications of strategy, but go too far outside the box and your fellow players will likely accuse you of playing a different game altogether—if you haven't already been disqualified by the referees. We will approach these questions by considering the history of biology as the history of philosophical attempts at making sense of life, broadly conceived, from Aristotle to Darwin. Such "philosophies" of life need not be held self-consciously, and the most interesting ones often aren't. Rather, any scientific account of life necessarily entails making metaphysical commitments. By tracing the history of these commitments, we will consider which (if any) of their historical mutations have been novel, and where we currently stand. We will also consider the ways in which philosophies of life, with all their metaphysical entanglements, have themselves been entangled with politics and ideology.

Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduates by Consent

HIST 47002  Colloquium: Interracial America  (M. Briones)  This course will examine the interaction between different racialized and ethnic groups in America (and beyond) from the eighteenth-century to our present moment. Conventional studies rely on a simplistic black-white paradigm of US race relations. This seminar aims to move beyond that dichotomy and searches for broader historical models, which include yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white. For example, how do we interpret recently excavated histories of Afro-Cherokee relations in antebellum America? What are hepcats, pachucos, and yogores? What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews? What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the civil rights movement? How does race operate differently in an ostensible racial paradise like Hawai‘i? How do we understand race, nation, and decolonization in a global context, as evidenced by radical activism in California in the 1960s and '70s? We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups." If conflicted, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluent, what goals have elicited cooperation?

HIST 49200  Colloquium: Approaches to Atlantic Slavery Studies  (R. Johnson)  We are witnessing an outpouring of scholarship on Atlantic slavery even as some historians are increasingly critical of the archival method. This course uses select theoretical readings and recent monographs and articles to examine this conceptual and methodological debate. Topics to be examined include histories of women, gender, and sexuality; dispossession and resistance; urban and migration history; and interdisciplinary and speculative techniques.

HIST 56706  Colloquium: Modern Korean History II  (B. Cumings)  To the extent possible, research papers should be based in primary materials; ideally this means Korean, Japanese, or Chinese materials, but some students cannot use Korean or another East Asian language for research until they embark on dissertations. An abundance of English-language research materials are available on twentieth-century Korea: American, Korean, and Japanese official reports, the Foreign Relations of the United States series, newspapers, paper collections, microfilms, dissertations based in primary materials, etc.

HIST 58602  Colloquium: Iran and Central Asia II  (J. Woods)  The second quarter will be devoted to the preparation of a major research paper.