Making History Work Events

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Image Source: Ad Meskens/Wikimedia Commons

 

Events from the 2016-2017 Academic Year

Third Annual History Presentation Extravaganza
  • The History Presentation Extravanganza challenges graduate students to give a five-minute talk that summarizes a part of their research, followed by a four-minute Q&A with the audience. The presentations provide an opportunity for graduate students to practice engaging diverse audiences--a skill crucial for everything from teaching to quick encounters at conferences, engaging those from other fields during job interviews, and convincing people within and beyond the academy of the value of your work. A panel of judges will assess each presentation for quality, substance, style, and accessibilty, with prizes awarded to the top three students. For an overview of the Presentation Extravaganza and its value for participants, see the overview of the event written by PhD Candidate Chris Dunlap, which can be found on AHA Today.
Online Teaching: Methods and Approaches for the Virtual Classroom
  • The Pedagogy Workshop and Making History Work are partnering to host a workshop designed to help you learn more about the ins and outs of online teaching. The session will be led by Helen Veit, Associate Professor of History at Michigan State University and specialist in online learning, and Kate Merkle-Hess, Assistant Professor of History and Asian Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies at Penn State University. Professors Veit and Merkle-Hess will provide an introduction to the world of online learning, practical tips on what knowledge and skills one needs to adapt their teaching for the virtual classroom, and advice on how graduate students can best position themselves for the ever-increasing number of teaching positions that involve some element of online instruction.
Public Speaking Workshops
  • Whether we are talking about our research, teaching students, delivering a paper, or leading a meeting, the ability to effectively convey ideas and information is central to our work as historians. This quarter, Making History Work will sponsor a series of six Public Speaking Workshops where graduate students can hone their communication skills in a fun, friendly, and constructive environment. The theme of the workshops will vary week to week, but each will focus on topics such as crafting an elevator speech, impromptu speaking, and how to effectively use body language and verbal cues to enhance your presentations. 
Job Materials Workshop for Non-Academic Careers and Internships
  • This workshop will provide an overview of everything you need to know when applying to internships or non-academic careers: how to read a job ad, the basics of the cover letter, crafting your own career narrative, and how to "translate" your CV into a resume. This session will be useful for anyone considering a non-ac or dual (academic and non-ac) job search in the next year, or if you are working on internship applications for the summer. 
Engaged Historians: The Art of Writing for the Public
  • How might we as historians might think about engaging with a broader public? Professors Kathleen Belew and Fredrik Albritton Jonsson will lead a conversation on this topic by discussing their own experiences translating their academic work for a wider audience and the impact and afterlife of those pieces. Their conversations will also leave space for a broader conversation about the discipline and public engagement today.
Digital Humanities Workshop: Introduction to GIS
  • GIS allows you to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, and present geographic data on maps. This session will focus on how GIS can be used for historians, discussing how you can find and georectify old maps to use in your research and the various (free and not-free) software options to consider. he session will be led by Taylor Hixson, the GIS Resident Librarian, and Department of History graduate student Emily Forden, who will  share how GIS has shaped her research and her dissertation project. As with the session last quarter on OCR, those who attend can sign up for a later tutorial that will walk you step-by-step through the process of creating a map and plotting your data. 
Alumni Lunches: Jessica Neptune, PhD '12, Associate Director of National Programs for the Bard Prison Initiative and Director of the Bard Prison Initiative in Chicago
  • Jessica Neptune received her PhD in US History from the University of Chicago in 2012. After graduation, she was named an ACLS Public Fellow and served as an expert on incarceration and criminal justice policy for the Obama Administration's Federal Interagency Reentry Council and within the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. She currently serves as the Associate Director of National Programs for the Bard Prison Initiative and Director of the Bard Prison Initiative in Chicago, a program which gives men and women in state prisons access to a full liberal arts education while they are incarcerated. Dr. Neptune will be visiting the department for lunch to discuss her career trajectory and provide advice for those looking to learn more about careers in the worlds of policy, non-profits, and higher education.
Headshots and Happy Hour
  • To kick off the new academic year, photographer Alan Klehr will return to the department on to take headshots for anyone who is interested. Photos will be taken in the Tea Room, and the happy hour component of the event will be the Department's Autumn Quarter Welcome Reception. 
Alumni Lunches: Fred Beuttler, PhD ’95, Assistant Dean of the Graham School and former Congressional Historian
  • After receiving his PhD in US History from the University of Chicago in 1995, Fred Beuttler taught at a small college for five years and then transitioned to work as an institutional historian for the University of Illinois at Chicago and later the US House of Representatives. He then accepted a position as a professor and Director of General Education at Carroll University. Currently, he is the Associate Dean of Liberal Arts at the Graham School. Dr. Beuttler will visit the department to have a casual conversation about his career trajectory and how graduate students might take practical steps to pursue som eof the types of jobs he has held.
To Self-Promote or Not to Self-Promote? A Conversation for Graduate Students about Networking, Publishing, and Online Presence
  • Recent advice for graduate students on how to land a job in a tough tenure-track market has emphasized the necessity of "branding" and active "self-promotion" to set themselves apart from the rest of the applicant pool. But are networking, social media, and an online presence really as crucial as the internet would have you believe? And how does this advice apply to historians in particular? Emily Swafford, UChicago PhD '14 and Programs Manager for the AHA, will lead a casual lunchtime conversation on whether or not this advice makes sense for our discipline and how you might choose to follow it (or not!).
Digital Humanities Workshop: Introduction to Ocular Character Recognition 
  • Does your research require sifting through large amounts of records or archival material (and you're unsure how you'll find the time to go through it all)? Are you curious to learn more about digital history? Would you like to become more familiar with the specific tools historians are using to push the discipline in new directions? If any of these apply, consider attending our Introduction to Ocular Character Recognition for Historians workshop. Optical Character Recognition, or OCR, is a technology that enables you to convert different types of documents, such as scanned paper documents, PDF files, or images captured by a digital camera, into editable and searchable data. This session will provide a broad overview of OCR, the software it uses, and its specific applications for historical research. Presenters will include Department faculty and students who have used the technology in their research and experts from the Resource Computing Center and the Visual Resources Center who can help you get started on campus. Those who attend can sign up for a follow-up workshop at a later date where they can participate in a hands-on OCR tutorial at the Visual Resources Center.

Events from the 2015-2016 Academic Year

Public Speaking Workshops
  • Whether we are talking about our research, teaching students, delivering a paper, or leading a meeting, the ability to effectively convey ideas and information is central to our work as historians. This quarter, Making History Work will sponsor a series of six Public Speaking Workshops where graduate students can hone their communication skills in a fun, friendly, and constructive environment. The theme of the workshops will vary week to week, but each will focus on topics such as crafting an elevator speech, impromptu speaking, and how to effectively use body language and verbal cues to enhance your presentations. 
Historians in the Public Sphere: A Conversation with David Perry
  • David Perry is an Associate Professor of History at Dominican University whose research focuses on Venice, the Crusades, and the Mediterranean World. He is also a popular journalist and blogger who regularly publishes on a wide variety of topics from disability rights to parenting, gender, and popular culture. His work has appeared on CNN.com, Al Jazeera America, the Chronicle of Higher Education, The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian, The Washington Post, The Nation, Vice.com, Salon, Pacific Standard Magazine, and many more. David will visit the Department of History to hold an informal lunchtime conversation about his experience as a historian in the public sphere, how and why he writes for different audiences in different media, and why it is valuable for graduate students to share their expertise with a wider audience.
From Dissertation to Book with Priya Nelson of the University of Chicago Press
  • How do you turn a dissertation into a book? What kinds of questions do academic press editors ask when deciding if a manuscript is worth publishing? How can you think strategically about a dissertation topic to maximize your chances of publication success further down the road? And what is the deal with dissertation embargoes? Priya Nelson, Associate Editor at the University of Chicago Press responsible for history acquisitions, will answer all these questions and more. Whether you're finishing a dissertation or just thinking about next year's seminar paper, it's never too early to start thinking about how to strategically craft your research projects and what you might do with all tthose pages of prose after you graduate. 
Historians in the Public Sphere: A Conversation with Ada Palmer
  • Ada Palmer is not only an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Chicago--she is also an author of science fiction and fantasy whose first novel, Too Like the Lightningwill be published in May. Ada will hold an informal conversation with graduate students about how her work as historian has benefitted from and been influenced by her fiction writing. 
Second Annual History Presentation Extravaganza
  • The History Presentation Extravanganza challenges graduate students to give a five-minute talk that summarizes a part of their research, followed by a four-minute Q&A with the audience. The presentations provide an opportunity for graduate students to practice engaging diverse audiences--a skill crucial for everything from teaching to quick encounters at conferences, engaging those from other fields during job interviews, and convincing people within and beyond the academy of the value of your work. A panel of judges will assess each presentation for quality, substance, style, and accessibilty, with prizes awarded to the top three students. For an overview of the Presentation Extravaganza and its value for participants, see the overview of last year's event written by PhD Candidate Chris Dunlap, which can be found on AHA Today.
Internship Information Lunch
  • Five graduate students will discuss their recent internship experiences, including the types of skills they learned and how the experience has helped their research and improved their work as historians. AJ Aronstein and Celina Chatman Nelson of UChicago Grad will be in attendance to discuss this year's internship opportunites for current graduate students. 
Bibliographic Tools for Historians
  • Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, will provide an overview of Endnote and Zotero and discuss the benefits of bibliographic software for historians.
Crash Course on Copyright, Open Access, and Author's Rights
  • Amy Buckland, UChicago's Institutional Repository manager, will provide an overview of all you need to know when publishing your work in print or online.
Visual Resources for Research and Teaching
  • Bridget Madden, Associate Director of the Visual Resources Center, will demonstrate how to acquire and manipulate images for the classroom and your own work. The Visual Resources Center will also provide a follow-up workshop for any students who would like an in-depth, hands-on tutorial in photo editing software.
Digital Humanities Lunch 
  • Jeff Tharsen, UChicago's new Digital Humanities Computing Consultant, will lead an informal discussion about the digital humanities and showcase a new project he is working on with the Department of History.
Time Management with Professor Ramón Gutiérrez
 
Managing a Seminar Research Project: Roundtable with HGSA Student Mentors
 
Perspectives on the Job Market with Professors Kathleen Belew and Paul Cheney
 
The Humanities "Crisis" and the Value of History with Professor Ken Pomeranz